Light When You Cannot See It (My Redeemer Lives 4:2)

Our family loves meteor showers.

Well, really, it’s my dad. My dad loves meteor showers.

The rest of us love sleep.

I have vibrant memories of my dad waking us up at 1am, 2am, or 4am, whenever the best time for viewing in our area was expected. He would wrap a blanket around each of us and we would climb into the car. We would drive about a quarter mile out into our neighbor’s field, get out of the car, and lay on the hood, all lined up, with our faces turned up to the night sky. Then, it would happen: a speck of light, then another, another, until it felt like all the light was falling out of the sky and filling the space around you. I wanted to catch the falling diamonds with my mouth or in my hands the way children catch snowflakes.

After the shower, as a kid, I wondered how all the stars in the sky could be left hanging, when so many had just fallen out of the sky. How was it we still had light when it has all just fallen and passed away?

As an adult, I found this passage, Job 9:7-10, that gave me my answer:

…who commands the sun, and it does not rise;

    who seals up the stars;

8 who alone stretched out the heavens

    and trampled the waves of the sea;

9 who made the Bear and Orion,

    the Pleiades and the chambers of the south;

10 who does great things beyond searching out,

    and marvelous things beyond number.

Now I know the difference between meteors and stars, between gaseous matter and chunks of blazing stone, but the biblical lesson still holds no matter the substance in the sky we consider.

You can’t take the stars out of the sky, and the sun is still shining even when we cannot see it.

God alone places them in their positions, stretches them out in the galaxies, and plucks white dwarfs out of the sky in their time.

We have such little minds. We continue to believe more easily that which we can see even as we grow from children into elderly.

Likewise, the resurrection of the dead is the easiest thing for us to set aside in our system of beliefs. We relegate it to unimportant, not worth arguing over, and at the very least ignored. We sleep through this important doctrine, when our Father in heaven would teach us and wake us up for His unbelievable and glorious display:

The dead rise at His beckoning. The tombs unseal and Life bursts forth.

Without the resurrection of the dead, we remain in darkness. If death is not defeated in its fullness, what is the point? We could be souls wandering around a heavenly space, but God gives us greater hope. We were made for physical resurrection.

Paul says it better. We find his argument in 1 Corinthians 15:12-28:

12 Now if Christ is proclaimed as raised from the dead, how can some of you say that there is no resurrection of the dead? 13 But if there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. 14 And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain. 15 We are even found to be misrepresenting God, because we testified about God that he raised Christ, whom he did not raise if it is true that the dead are not raised. 16 For if the dead are not raised, not even Christ has been raised. 17 And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. 19 If in Christ we have hope in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied.

20 But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. 21 For as by a man came death, by a man has come also the resurrection of the dead. 22 For as in Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive. 23 But each in his own order: Christ the firstfruits, then at his coming those who belong to Christ. 24 Then comes the end, when he delivers the kingdom to God the Father after destroying every rule and every authority and power. 25 For he must reign until he has put all his enemies under his feet. 26 The last enemy to be destroyed is death. 27 For “God has put all things in subjection under his feet.” But when it says, “all things are put in subjection,” it is plain that he is excepted who put all things in subjection under him. 28 When all things are subjected to him, then the Son himself will also be subjected to him who put all things in subjection under him, that God may be all in all.

God is all in all, and we see this vaguely in the stars hanging in the sky even when it’s cloudy and our own vision obscured. We see this more clearly in His Word, like this passage we just read that proclaims Jesus as the firstfruit of resurrection, which means there are the next fruits – each of us raised with Him. One day, we will see this fully: satan stomped underfoot, and our entire world restored. We will be bodily resurrected, with perfect bodies and a celebration like no other. It makes me sit and wonder if the angels praising Him will look like the thousand glimmering specks of meteors I watched with my dad, and there we will be watching them again together, praising together.

“Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord God Almighty,

    who was and is and is to come!” (Revelation 4:8b)

Look at 1 Corinthians 15:19 again:

If in Christ we have hope in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied.

We have hope for so much more than this life, even so much more than heaven. We wait for the resurrection of the dead, which means I will praise and rejoice with my dad one day. This is no small hope.

I want to be a next fruit.

I want to stand on this earth again and sing with sparkling angels and all those who have gone before me.

We preach and teach the resurrection of the dead, something we cannot see, because we do not want to rob people of their hope. God gives light from the stars in the sky and warmth from the sun when we cannot see it, and hope for a life where those same stars will shine for Him again – brighter and more perfect.

The same is true of me and of you. You shine for Him now, even when you cannot see it, but oh, will you shine for Him again, praising Him

who does great things beyond searching out,

    and marvelous things beyond number. (Job 9:10)

with feet firmly planted on resurrection soil.

Death, Rebirth, and Growing Like Weeds (My Redeemer Lives 1:4)

We aren’t the only things in this universe that die and rise.


As egocentric as we like to be, myself included, there is a whole world out there functioning quite unaware of any of us.

I’m reminded of hunting season. My husband is a bow hunter. He spends great time and care prepping himself to “enter the woods.” The woods is the domain of the deer. He might have dominion, but if he’d like to catch one for dinner, he needs to respect their domain. He uses special scent free shampoo, wears this camouflage suit with only his eyes peeking out, and virtually tip toes to his tree stand.

Nature is doing it’s thing, mostly unaware of us, until we make it aware. Just like us, every living thing has a life cycle. Jesus uses this life cycle in John 12 to teach us about life, death, risk, and eternal reward.

Pleas read John 12:20-26 –

20 Now among those who went up to worship at the feast were some Greeks. 21 So these came to Philip, who was from Bethsaida in Galilee, and asked him, “Sir, we wish to see Jesus.” 22 Philip went and told Andrew; Andrew and Philip went and told Jesus. 23 And Jesus answered them, “The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified. 24 Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit. 25 Whoever loves his life loses it, and whoever hates his life in this world will keep it for eternal life. 26 If anyone serves me, he must follow me; and where I am, there will my servant be also. If anyone serves me, the Father will honor him.

People want to see Jesus (verse 20), obviously that’s the most important thing! If people want to see you, if your phone notifies you of a call or a text or a message, do you feel pulled to answer?

Jesus did not (see John 12:36 for confirmation). Instead, he tells a story about a seed. I think Jesus’s message is two-fold here.

First, He is prophesying of His own death and resurrection. The preceding verses are of the Triumphal Entry of Jesus into Jerusalem, the beginning of Holy Week. The verses that follow immediately after those we read continue to speak of the necessity of the cross, the grave, and an empty tomb. All of John 12 is a powerful testimony of what is to come for Jesus and the power He holds over life and death.

Secondary, however, I believe is a parable about our lives. You see, each of us are seeds, planted by the Sower. In this parable the Greek for earth is from the root word gé, meaning earth, land, or soil. It is related to the Hebrew term for earth, asitía, a broader term connected to God. Earth is seen by way of this term as “God’s physical theater, God’s arena.” 

We are in God’s hands, living His story, whether we know it or not. Unlike the deer, God is fully aware of our entries, our exits, and our treading on His soil.

The seed doesn’t go into the soil to tuck itself into a dark and safe place. We weren’t meant to live and die alone. The seed goes into the soil and is planted for a purpose. It dies to its former life, it gives up its identity as seed, relinquishing power to the sun, the rain, the soil to be reborn. We are reborn in baptism. The Spirit comes in with Its nutrients, living moisture, sunlight for our souls, and we grow. We can muscle against all of this or let Him fully in. We can get wrapped up in how it’s all going to turn out, or trust the Sower with the process.

Commentator Matthew Henry puts it like this –

“…let us beg Him to make us indifferent to the trifling concerns of life. ”

Forget the planting, the dying to self, whether the rain falls, cloudy days or sunny days, and let’s live boldly for eternity. This space and time in dark soil or bright sunlight is so temporary.

God makes each day eternally significant.

We die and we rise in Him, for Him, and only through Him.

Seed to soil, sun to seed, today to tomorrow.

Life, death, and more Life. That is our resurrection reality.

How can we live it boldly? Tell us in the comments or join the conversation on social media. Bold resurrection death and bold resurrection life – how do you see them lived out each day in yourself and others?


Above All Names – Faithful & True

Then I saw heaven opened, and behold, a white horse! The one sitting on it is called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he judges and makes war. Revelation 19:11

You and I have not seen Jesus in person. We have the great benefit of of the Spirit living and working in us until we see our Savior face to face. Today’s verse gives us a glimpse of when we will see Him riding in on that day when the devil will be completely stomped underfoot. The Titles Faithful and True connect to Christ’s judgement in righteousness. Jesus came as a baby boy in a manger, as Truth itself, because rightness matters. When life seems like evil is winning, we can lean on Faithful and True. Christ makes right our hearts and our lives in His death and resurrection. Evil and sorrow may last for the night, but just as the Bethlehem star appeared, Joy does come in the morning. It is promised to us in Christ Jesus. Be not dismayed, Faithfulness and Truth is at work!